I have a confession to make: I always shrugged off the concept of ‘being in the moment’. What does that mean, anyway? You have to plan ahead and dream and make things better, right? How can you do that if you are sitting in your own presence.

Here is one of the lessons I have learned lately: being in the now takes discipline and is probably the most  active way to live your life. I always pictured people who abide by this concept as being passive and just going where the wind takes them. But as I take time to understand myself and reconnect, I see ‘Now’ as a living entity.

Living in the ‘Now’ means that you have to do what is in front of you. You have to look at life honestly and see what needs to be done right now. And that calls for choices at every instant. For example, the most important thing right now for me, is to make sure that my family is safe and that they have all they need to grow. What that means concretely, is that for me to be able to do that, I have to be rested and have all the energy at my disposal. So I have decided to go to sleep early, sometimes at the same time as the kids if that’s what I need. That’s what needs to be done Now. It is my sacred duty. I choose to put other things aside because that is what ‘Now’ requires of me. So ‘living life in the moment’ calls us to make choices, to live actively and to not get lost in a hypothetical future.

Going back to being a ‘student’ has been a great exercise in humility. Why humility? Well, having written a book and having people consult with me and blogging etc… There is always the presumption that that is a great thing that I have to continue doing. What author does not want to keep publishing? I certainly do. I love writing more than anything else I have done in my work. But I had to also acknowledge the ego part of that and the fact that this moment was for reconnecting myself and reading the signs of what this moment is telling me. ‘Now’ requires something else of me and that there is no greater honor than to honor that commitment.
I am sure that you all have things that you feel you should do. The truth is that right now, there is only one thing you must do. You know what it is.

My children’s birthdays have become a rite of passage as much for them as for myself. After all, the years roll for all of us whether we wish it or not. But the day where I became a mother is without question the biggest rite of passage of my life. It will probably have no equal other than the Great Passage that will occur when my earthly days end.

My dearest boy, my first born, turned 6 years old today. It is always emotional for me, not only because he is getting older, but because of how this symbolizes my own birthing into motherhood. For someone like me who was always deeply involved in thought and meditation, motherhood opened me up to the new realm of deep and overwhelming emotion. By becoming a mother, I learned to feel. It taught me compassion and fear and love and amazement.

Yesterday, we did the socially required ritual of the ‘children’s birthday party’: a first for us, I am still just barely recovering. I don’t think I was that stressed on my wedding day!

Tonight, we spent a quiet evening together. After the kids were in bed, I retreated to my room and made an offering to the Almighty for the blessing that is my son. I offered the only present I felt appropriate for the birth a firstborn son: frankincense and myrrh. I thanked my Lord for granting me such a precious ward and the Great Mother for keeping us in her care.

I have a cute little story to share. I was putting my son to bed last night. As I was getting up to leave, he says: “J’ai peur des monstres.” I’m afraid of monsters. I start play fighting, showing him that I’m beating up all the monsters. He says: “No Mommy. Angels.”

I’m about to cast a circle and call the Archangels to stand at every corner in the kids’ room. Then I stop. I look at my boy and ask him: “What do you want to say to the angels?” My own little angel of almost 5, who has a hard time to put four words in row, scrunching up his face with the effort, looks at me and says: “Angels…. Come home.”

 

My heart swelled up. I asked him: “Can you see them?” He said yes. He turned on his side. And he fell asleep.

Hello everyone!

Our town holds an annual traditional craft fair every labor day weekend. We took the kids on Sunday and had a blast. This was hosted by a local school of traditional crafts that we are lucky to have here on the south shore of Montreal. There were booths everywhere of people showcasing their handy work: book binding, barrel making, lace and embroidery, quilting, soap making, smithing, wood and copper carving… It was beautiful to see ordinary people continue to make things with their hands and to keep the tradition and knowledge alive.  The first time that I was forced to make something with my hands was through my magic classes. I had painted for many years, but crafting was new to me and I felt like I was all thumbs! We did some magical crafts, like the corn dolly, besom (magical broom), binding a book of shadows, decorating a wand and staff… We also had a section of cultural crafts, like adinkra, pysanka eggs, egyptian plaquettes… We had to learn calligraphy (and not smudge the ink!) At the time, I thought it was all nice, but what is the point of this again? Later, when I arrived up north, I took up native traditional crafts. It was the easiest way to get in touch with the culture, so I made moose-hide mittens, moccasins for my kids, sealskin mittens for my husband. I learned to embroider the hide, which was really hard at first. And I got really into it. As my first pregnancy progressed, I took up quilting. I felt it was a nice way to honor my maternal lineage and my grandmother who was an expert quilter. The more I got involved in making things, the more I understood ‘the point’ of it all. Making things puts you in a sort of trance state. It allows the conscious, logical brain to hush up for a little while and lets that intuitive part take over. It is also a great way to experience the aspect of ‘creation’ which is part of our divine heritage. And as a witch, it grounded me in the real world, linking above and below, which is one of the main reasons I am walking this path.

My son and daughter posing in a vintage fire engine

The country fair was a fun filled afternoon. It was, in fact, the most fun we’ve had at a summer event this year. Unlike the other events we went to, it did not cost us $100 for a few hours, and we didn’t have to wait hours in the blistering sun to bounce three and a half minutes on a bouncy thingy. The kids had a tremendous time in the game sections.

The most fun you can have with a board and two elastics!

Hitting a bunch of cans with a baseball is loads of fun for a

four-year-old! A carousel ride and a cotton candy later, we went home quite content.