I was priviledged to hear an exceptional speech by Dr. Robert Thurman at the conference on Wednesday. My few words really don’t do justic to his passion and humor. He is the embodiment of the ultimate professor. You know, the one you really want to have. For more on Dr. Thurman, please visit his site: http://www.bobthurman.com/

 Robert A.F. Thurman is the Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies in the Department of Religion at Columbia University, and co-founder and President of Tibet House US. He writes and lectures frequently on Buddhism, Asian history, and critical philosophy. A personal friend of the Dalai Lama for over 40 years, his latest book is Why the Dalai Lama Matters: His Act of Truth as the Solution for China, Tibet and the World.

 Words from Dr. Robert Thurman

Religion has long been identified as a cause of conflict and war. It is important to understand that it is not religion itself that causes war, but the misuse of it. All religions are united by what Dr. Thurman calls ‘The religious experience’. This religious experience is composed of three things:

1)     An experience of the transcendent

2)     Tangible fruit of this experience, known as love, compassion, truth and so forth

3)     A belief in the immortality of the soul

It is the purpose of all humans (including atheists and agnostics) to find that religious experience and spread the feeling to others. We become citizens of the universe by sharing this religious experience that transcends our own culture and tradition.

 On the subject of interfaith dialogue, the Dalaï-Lama considers two things. First, he aknowledges his own personal excludism in that he has chosen his own personal religion at the exclusion of all others. He believes in the wisdom teachings of his religion and ascribes to its practices. Secondly, he promotes social pluralism. While each person walks within the beliefs of his own chosen religion, there should be a common understanding that each religion upholds the same truth and should be respected and honored. This leads to many traditions walking side by side, instead of having one universal, non-denominational human spirituality devoid of inner complexity and challenge. Our religious tradition is the one best suited to our disposition and the most likely to lead us to that religious experience which unites us all.

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