Hello everyone!

Our town holds an annual traditional craft fair every labor day weekend. We took the kids on Sunday and had a blast. This was hosted by a local school of traditional crafts that we are lucky to have here on the south shore of Montreal. There were booths everywhere of people showcasing their handy work: book binding, barrel making, lace and embroidery, quilting, soap making, smithing, wood and copper carving… It was beautiful to see ordinary people continue to make things with their hands and to keep the tradition and knowledge alive.  The first time that I was forced to make something with my hands was through my magic classes. I had painted for many years, but crafting was new to me and I felt like I was all thumbs! We did some magical crafts, like the corn dolly, besom (magical broom), binding a book of shadows, decorating a wand and staff… We also had a section of cultural crafts, like adinkra, pysanka eggs, egyptian plaquettes… We had to learn calligraphy (and not smudge the ink!) At the time, I thought it was all nice, but what is the point of this again? Later, when I arrived up north, I took up native traditional crafts. It was the easiest way to get in touch with the culture, so I made moose-hide mittens, moccasins for my kids, sealskin mittens for my husband. I learned to embroider the hide, which was really hard at first. And I got really into it. As my first pregnancy progressed, I took up quilting. I felt it was a nice way to honor my maternal lineage and my grandmother who was an expert quilter. The more I got involved in making things, the more I understood ‘the point’ of it all. Making things puts you in a sort of trance state. It allows the conscious, logical brain to hush up for a little while and lets that intuitive part take over. It is also a great way to experience the aspect of ‘creation’ which is part of our divine heritage. And as a witch, it grounded me in the real world, linking above and below, which is one of the main reasons I am walking this path.

My son and daughter posing in a vintage fire engine

The country fair was a fun filled afternoon. It was, in fact, the most fun we’ve had at a summer event this year. Unlike the other events we went to, it did not cost us $100 for a few hours, and we didn’t have to wait hours in the blistering sun to bounce three and a half minutes on a bouncy thingy. The kids had a tremendous time in the game sections.

The most fun you can have with a board and two elastics!

Hitting a bunch of cans with a baseball is loads of fun for a

four-year-old! A carousel ride and a cotton candy later, we went home quite content.

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